• A study to find out what people think about the 999 and 101 non-emergency police call lines is launched today
  • Residents will be questioned on their understanding of the two services and whether they think there are better ways of contacting the police
  • The survey is run by the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners and will help inform police forces, the Home Office and local commissioners on the challenges around reporting to the police and help form plans for the future
  • Police and Crime Commissioner Chris Nelson said, “Reporting to 101 and 999 remains a very challenging area of business. It’s an issue the Constabulary is struggling to address, which is why I have directed more resources towards the force control room”
  • The Police Contact Survey opens today and runs until midnight on Sunday, June 26.

Even though you hope you will never need to call the police, trying to get through when you do, can sometimes test a caller’s patience.

That is why the public, in Gloucestershire as well as the rest of the country, is being asked to take a few minutes to tell police forces about their experiences of the 101 and 999 services, as well as their preference for future modes of contact.

The Police Contact Survey opens today (May 18) and runs until midnight on Sunday, June 26.

Participants are being asked a series of questions to test their understanding of emergency and non-emergency reporting systems, as well as newly emerging ways of contacting the police, like web chat, online forms and messaging over social media.

The survey, run by the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners, will help inform police forces, the Home Office and local commissioners on any challenges around reporting to the police and assist in forming plans for the future.

Police and Crime Commissioner Chris Nelson said: “Reporting to 101 and 999 remains a very challenging area of business. It’s an issue the Constabulary is struggling to address, which is why I have directed more resources towards the force control room.

“I also hope that the introduction of new technology will present significant opportunities to speed up responses and open lines of communication with people who might prefer to use the internet and social media.

“The needs of those making contact must be understood but while the Constabulary must be able to prioritise those most in need, the public must also understand when it is appropriate to use which line and that there are other ways of getting in touch.

“It is important that as the voice of the public in policing, Police and Crime Commissioners understand their constituents’ views on these issues. For that reason, I urge as many people as possible to respond to the survey.”

The survey can be completed by clicking on the link here: https://www.smartsurvey.co.uk/s/CrimeReporting-National-Public-Contact-Survey-APCC/