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Monday 16 January 2017, 12:35 PM
  • Farmor’s is top of the class for road safety
  • The first in Gloucestershire to be involved in all of the road safety tuition schemes available to schools, colleges and other training establishments
  • PCC Martin Surl said ““Whilst it’s true that most of our schools have taken part in at least one of the courses, I hope they follow Farmor’s example and go on to complete the set”.
  • Gloucestershire Road Safety Partnership’s latest initiative “Eyes on the Road” scheduled for later this year

When it comes to doing their best to keep their students safe on the roads, Farmor’s School in Fairford are prepared to go the extra mile.

Tomorrow, (Tuesday Jan 17ththe Cotswolds’ secondary will become the first to be involved in all of the road safety tuition schemes available to schools, colleges and other training establishments in Gloucestershire.

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Around 220 Farmors’ students have been given a day off lessons to take part in ‘Drive for Life’, a day long workshop involving first-hand accounts of the wide ranging effects of a fatal road accident and practical exercises to get the message across.

Head of Sixth Form Emma White said, “We are delighted to be part of this initiative to promote safer driving for young people in Gloucestershire and are very grateful to all the services and volunteers who are giving up their time to make this experience as real as possible for our students.

“Although their A levels are important, making good, informed decisions when driving is invaluable and it is good to see both our students and parents seeing this as a vital part of their education”.   

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Drive for Life at Katherine Lady Berkeley's School, Wotton Under Edge

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Police and Crime Commissioner Martin Surl, who has prioritised making the county’s roads safer said: “Farmor’s commitment is very welcome. All the evidence shows that young drivers are one of the most vulnerable groups of road users and it’s imperative we do all we can to prepare and protect them as far as possible.

“Whilst it’s true that most of our schools have taken part in at least one of the courses, I hope they follow Farmor’s example and go on to complete the set”.

‘Drive for Life’ is one of the initiatives organised by Gloucestershire’s Road Safety Partnership (RSP) along with What if? a roadshow also based on serious and fatal collisions; Passenger, which encourages passengers to speak up; a local version of Drive iQ the online tuition programme and ‘Wrecked’, which highlights the danger of driving under the influence of drink and drugs. Later this year the partnership will introduce a new project called “Eyes on the road”.

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Drive for Life at Hartpury College

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Students at a 'Wrecked' presentation learn the danger of driving under the influence of drink and drugs

RSP Director of Operations and Gloucestershire Fire and Rescue Service’s Chief Officer Stewart Edgar, said: “Nobody means to harm or hurt anybody while driving and we aim to give students the tools to ensure it does not happen to them or their friends.

“Being confronted with the reality and hearing from those who have lost loved ones can be tough but it’s the most effective way to help students understand the consequences of making poor driving choices.”

A number of outside organisations will also support the day, including the Institute of Advanced Motoring, Kwikfit and the Great Western Air Ambulance Charity. 

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